Bevis

Bevis Whiz Away it went bend first and rose against the wind till the impetus ceased when it hung a moment on the air and slid to the right falling near the summer house Next time it turned to the left

  • Title: Bevis
  • Author: Richard Jefferies
  • ISBN: 9781853261633
  • Page: 103
  • Format: Paperback
  • Whiz Away it went, bend first, and rose against the wind till the impetus ceased, when it hung a moment on the air, and slid to the right, falling near the summer house Next time it turned to the left, and fell in the hedge another time it hit the hay rick nothing could make it go straight Mark tried his hardest, and used it both ways, but in vain the boomerang roseWhiz Away it went, bend first, and rose against the wind till the impetus ceased, when it hung a moment on the air, and slid to the right, falling near the summer house Next time it turned to the left, and fell in the hedge another time it hit the hay rick nothing could make it go straight Mark tried his hardest, and used it both ways, but in vain the boomerang rose against the wind, and, so far, acted properly, but directly the force with which it was thrown was exhausted, it did as it liked, and swept round to the left or the right, and never once returned to their feet.

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      103 Richard Jefferies
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      Published :2019-01-02T02:04:40+00:00

    About “Richard Jefferies

    • Richard Jefferies

      John Richard Jefferies 1848 1887 is best known for his prolific and sensitive writing on natural history, rural life and agriculture in late Victorian England However, a closer examination of his career reveals a many sided author who was something of an enigma To some people he is familiar as the author of the children s classic Bevis or the strange futuristic fantasy After London , while he also has some reputation as a mystic worthy of serious study Since his death his books have enjoyed intermittent spells of popularity, but today he is unknown to the greater part of the reading public Jefferies, however, has been an inspiration to a number of prominent writers and W.H Hudson, Edward Thomas, Henry Williamson and John Fowles are among those who have acknowledged their debt to him In my view his greatest achievement lies in his expression, aesthetically and spiritually, of the human encounter with the natural world something that became almost an obsession for him in his last years.He was born at Coate in the north Wiltshire countryside now on the outskirts of Swindon where his family farmed a smallholding of about forty acres His father was a thoughtful man with a passionate love of nature but was unsuccessful as a farmer, with the result that the later years of Jefferies childhood were spent in a household increasingly threatened by poverty There were also, it seems, other tensions in the family Richard s mother, who had been brought up in London, never settled into a life in the country and the portrait of her as Mrs Iden usually regarded as an accurate one in his last novel, Amaryllis at the Fair , is anything but flattering Remarks made in some of Jefferies childhood letters to his aunt also strongly suggest an absence of mutual affection and understanding between mother and son A combination of an unsettled home life and an early romantic desire for adventure led him at the age of sixteen to leave home with the intention of traversing Europe as far as Moscow In this escapade he was accompanied by a cousin, but the journey was abandoned soon after they reached France On their return to England they attempted to board a ship for the United States but this plan also came to nothing when they found themselves without sufficient money to pay for food.A self absorbed and independent youth, Jefferies spent much of his time walking through the countryside around Coate and along the wide chalk expanses of the Marlborough Downs He regularly visited Burderop woods and Liddington Hill near his home and on longer trips explored Savernake Forest and the stretch of the downs to the east, where the famous white horse is engraved in the hillside above Uffington His favourite haunt was Liddington Hill, a height crowned with an ancient fort commanding superb views of the north Wiltshire plain and the downs It was on the summit of Liddington at the age of about eighteen, as he relates in The Story of My Heart, that his unusual sensitivity to nature began to induce in him a powerful inner awakening a desire for a larger existence or reality which he termed soul life Wherever he went in the countryside he found himself in awe of the beauty and tranquillity of the natural world not only the trees, flowers and animals, but also the sun, the stars and the entire cosmos seemed to him to be filled with an inexpressible sense of magic and meaning.

    779 thoughts on “Bevis

    • This is a marvellous book, to be read slowly and to lose yourself in. Take this descriptive passage:"The leaves with light under them as well as above became films oftransparent green, the delicate branches were delineated with finestcamel's hair point, all the grass blades heaped together were apart, andtheir edges apparent in the thick confusion; every atom of sand upon theshore was sought out by the beams, and given an individual existenceamid the inconceivable multitude which the sibyl alone [...]


    • This book is the most wonderful evocation of times long gone. My favourite book about childhood, an essential read.


    • This book is a huge surprise. Nothing quite like it. It's full of adventures that especially suits boys; discovering lands, hunting, fishing, building forts, making sails and a mast, having battles and surviving in a Bear Grylls sort of way but written almost a century ago and full of outstanding observation of both people and nature. Men should read this book to their or with their sons and I'm glad I read it for the insight into the way some males feel and think. Actually the technical things [...]


    • Gol-leee. I liked it. The boys were having fun, building a raft, having a mock war, behaving like wild things. And then it just went on and on and on. I think I learned how to sail, how to make a gun, how to shoot it, all in painstakingly boring detail. I admit to skim-reading to the end. Nope. Not for me.


    • It was a good, yet slow read. A little Huckleberry Finn / Tom Sawyer, mixed with a shot of Lord of the Flies, and maybe an inkling of Bridge to TerabithiaA good read for those who would play explorer or war as kids - sections brought me back to a simpler childhood, in which your mind is allowed to wander. Overall a decent read that will stay in my collection, but probably not picked up again


    • Read this years ago as a Pre teenager. Didn't like the class differences at the time, Bevis being particularly nasty, but realised in later years this was normal for the time.It's beautifully written, Bevis and friends were able to do whatever they wanted, including making guns !As someone else has commented, it's a British Huck Finn



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