The Way of the Moving Horse

The Way of the Moving Horse The Way of the Moving Horse is the second volume of the award winning Learn to Play Go series Covers fundamentals of good play including opening theory enclosures and approaches bases and extension

  • Title: The Way of the Moving Horse
  • Author: Janice Kim Jeong Soo-Hyun
  • ISBN: 9780964479623
  • Page: 147
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Way of the Moving Horse is the second volume of the award winning Learn to Play Go series Covers fundamentals of good play, including opening theory, enclosures and approaches, bases and extensions, invasion and reduction, attack and defense, capturing races, ko, life and death, contact fighting, and endgame Shows the Korean school s strength vs speed model to choosThe Way of the Moving Horse is the second volume of the award winning Learn to Play Go series Covers fundamentals of good play, including opening theory, enclosures and approaches, bases and extensions, invasion and reduction, attack and defense, capturing races, ko, life and death, contact fighting, and endgame Shows the Korean school s strength vs speed model to choose between six basic moves Includes self test and Internet Go section.

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      Posted by:Janice Kim Jeong Soo-Hyun
      Published :2019-09-23T12:57:02+00:00

    About “Janice Kim Jeong Soo-Hyun

    • Janice Kim Jeong Soo-Hyun

      Janice Kim Jeong Soo-Hyun Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Way of the Moving Horse book, this is one of the most wanted Janice Kim Jeong Soo-Hyun author readers around the world.

    496 thoughts on “The Way of the Moving Horse

    • So first of all - my go game really sucks. I say that I "play go" and that I learned to play a long time ago, but it's been this occasional thing that I get interested in every now and then, and then stop playing for years and years. Like writing, martial arts, and various other activities I have pursued off and on for many years, it depresses me sometimes when I consider how good I'd be if I had actually stuck with it way back when I first got interested, and how unlikely I am to ever really be [...]


    • This is my favourite of the series so far; I already knew most of the content in Book 1, but here Kim covers the haengma (standard moves), ko fights and threats, capturing races, life and death (throw-ins, vital points), endgame plays, and myriad tactics in attack and defence (pincers, capping, shoulder-hits, pinning, invasion, reduction, passing under, iron pillars, ladder breakers, peeps, spikes).These are the building-block tactics that strengthen your game immensely, preventing you from bein [...]


    • I bought the entire series of Learn to Play Go a few years ago. This was the last book in the series that I managed to read. The books are well written, and helpful to beginning and intermediate Go players. Unfortunately, I realized that I do have enough time to master Go to the level that I wish I could. So, it's time for me to move on to other projects.


    • Very good continuation to Volume 1.In this volume the authors focus on expanding a bit on the basic concepts presented in the previous book. They continue to do so in a clear fashion and with plenty of diagrams so we can follow along without need of a board. First they talk about the opening strategy and give clear rules as to how to approach this face of the game. These concepts should help guide the beginner, but as soon as you have played for a couple of months you are going to need more than [...]


    • As a Go player who knew the rules and not much else before opening this book, I found Kim's work extremely valuable. I came out with a working understanding of the purpose and structure of Go's opening, midgame, and endgame, as well as what kind of moves achieve the objectives of each phase. Especially helpful was the titular Way of the Moving Horse: thinking about positions in terms of the connections between stones. This book certainly did not enable me, a novice, to follow every move of a sub [...]


    • Think this is my second or third time reading this book. I think it is starting to sink in. Easy to follow, not as easy as book 1 in the series, but really book 1 is just a glossed over "how to play go" with just a bit more than the basic rules. I wonder if the fact that they are just slowly expanding the vocabulary of go terms will happer me if I decided to branch out to other book series.Just finishing up this book and book 1 from the graded go problems for beginners. Next up will be book 3 of [...]


    • Volumn two of Janice Kim's series on learning Go is her best book. She takes the lessons she taught in her first book and delves deeper into the game. She talks about different types of moves, and their strengths and weaknesses, such as the Knight's move, Horse Jump, Tiger's Jaw, Large Knight's move, shoulder hit, one space jumps, two space and three space jumps. She also talks more about capturing stones, giving life, ko's, fighting Ko's, and the endgame.


    • This book is easy to read, there are lots of diagrams, and some cool pictures. My main problem with it is that its overall level is quite simple and so it isn't likely to remain useful to the reader for very long. It's kind of surpising in this way, because it is actually the second volume in a series. (I haven't looked at others.) Might be useful for a club, library, or someone who is likely to be introducing the game to new players.


    • While the instruction is very clear, there is not a lot of depth to this book. Several chapters are only four pages or so in length. Considering the large (and very nice) diagrams on each page, this does not leave much room for text. I certainly think this is a good book, but wish that this series had fewer books and more depth per book.


    • Back when I read this book it was a fascination book. (first go book I ever read.) Back then I didn't know much past the rules of the game, now of course this book feels like common sense to me. Its really is a great book for its attended audience.


    • At the time I read this book, I was just learning the fundamentals of Go. This was an entertaining book, as well as an educational book on the game. After reading it my game improved substantially. The author knows how to teach Go, and makes it fun to learn.


    • Solid book. Delivered a bunch of useful information.By the end of this book there were only a few instances where I didn't follow the author's logic or understand why a "good play" was good. Overall though, very satisfied.



    • This is a nice intro to Go. It's easy to read and covers many of the basics to get you up and running in the game. This was a re-read for me. It's good to go over the basics from time to time.




    • A gentle elaboration on volume one. Not so useful on its own, but good as a second step in a longer program of study.





    • This volume actually begins to explore some basic go strategy. I found it very helpful for my novice play.


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