Americans and the California Dream, 1850-1915

Americans and the California Dream In the late nineteenth century California became the cutting edge of the American dream the final frontier both geographically and in the minds of the many men and women who went there to pursue the

  • Title: Americans and the California Dream, 1850-1915
  • Author: Kevin Starr
  • ISBN: 9780195042337
  • Page: 445
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the late nineteenth century, California became the cutting edge of the American dream, the final frontier both geographically and in the minds of the many men and women who went there to pursue their destinies In this fascinating volume Keven Starr examines California s formative years to discover the orgins of the California dreams and the social, psychological, anIn the late nineteenth century, California became the cutting edge of the American dream, the final frontier both geographically and in the minds of the many men and women who went there to pursue their destinies In this fascinating volume Keven Starr examines California s formative years to discover the orgins of the California dreams and the social, psychological, and symbolic impact it has had not only on Californians but on the rest of the country.

    • Best Download [Kevin Starr] ï Americans and the California Dream, 1850-1915 || [Philosophy Book] PDF ↠
      445 Kevin Starr
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      Posted by:Kevin Starr
      Published :2019-01-09T20:17:23+00:00

    About “Kevin Starr

    • Kevin Starr

      Kevin Starr was an American historian, best known for his multi volume series on the history of California, collectively called America and the California Dream.

    432 thoughts on “Americans and the California Dream, 1850-1915

    • This is a book I found fascinating even though it seemed to drag on forever. I worked on it for over two weeks. I'm a native Californian and this book taught me many new things. The content would have worked very well for the Cultural Geography of California course I took ages ago. The book was first published in 1972. I was surprised and pleased to find the content was quiet honest about many racist and cruel elements in California's past, and how that connected to the very title of the book. T [...]


    • highly readable telling of the early history of California. covers the Spanish colonial period, the gold rush, the San Francisco earthquake, etc. Starr is clearly a proponent of the "great man" theory of history, i.e. that charismatic, powerful or intelligent individuals are the driver behind behind historical forces, trends and events. as such, his account focuses on a series of biographical sketches of the influential early settlers and leaders of California, from politics, commerce, arts & [...]


    • As a native Californian (San Francisco) I read this book after seeing it cited again and again as an excellent entry point for a study of California history.I was not disappointed. I believe this book is widely acknowledged as a classic in the field of California history, and I certainly wouldn't disagree with that judgment.Prof. Starr attempts to illuminate the psychology of early California by providing mini-biographies of important California residents. These biographies are linked together b [...]


    • It took me 11 months, but I finally finished.And I am very disappointed. I will not be reading the rest of this series, and am removing another book by the author from my tbr.In spite of the title of this book, it is not about "Americans and the California Dream." Rather, it is about the elite in California, and what they thought of California, what they wanted it to be, and/or what they dreamed of it being. These were not Americans dreaming a dream and coming to California. These were the peopl [...]


    • Not so much a history of early California as a history of the intricate shifts of what California meant to those who settled here in the first fifty years after the regrettable discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill. Starr also travels back before 1849 to visit the perceptions of pre-Gold Rush California in the writings of such New Englanders as Thomas Larkin and Walter Colton, who urged an accommodation with Californio culture, and Richard Henry Dana, who was much more ambivalent, and viewed the Me [...]


    • Informative, slightly repetitive, gracefully written, occasionally tending toward tedium. Starr sometimes gets a bit deeper into the weeds on certain topics of limited interest--the founding of Stanford, for example--than a reader looking for a general early cultural history of California might want or expect. That said, an important and necessary book in developing an understanding of the cultural development of California.


    • This is the first in a series of books Kevin Starr has written on California over the past 30-odd years. Given that these are often dredged up by modern policy-makers and political pundits, I was surprised to discover that this first one is predominately a literary history. It's mainly a series of biographies of California writers along with analysis of their work. "Writers" is treated broadly though, with everyone from the philosopher Josiah Royce to politician Henry George to preacher Thomas S [...]


    • i saw an interesting review of 'Golden Dreams California in an Age of Abundance, 1950-1963'.upon a bit of research, turns out the author, has been writing a whole series onCalyfornia , this first one published in 1973ing cursed with being list oriented, i got inspired or perhaps infatuated to readthe set. i'm most interested in those 20s-60s years, kinda frombirth of hollywood to chinatown to summer of love , but the rulesof reading a list, self inflicted, say i have to start at the beginning, s [...]


    • I am simultaneously reading this book and Elaine Elison's "Wherever ther's a fight". Both are great California history books, but I think are better appreciated with a grounding in the basic timeline and rendition of historical events. "Wherever there's a fight" focuses on civil liberties (as per its title and the author's background w/ the ACLU). This is the "People's History of Calif." I was already knowledgeable about most of the events from my decades long submersion in lefty literature. Sta [...]


    • The first thing to recognize before reading this book is that it unabashedly follows the “great man” theory of history. This is NOT a people’s history of California (although later volumes might be). The book was first published in 1973, a different time in intellectual thought. It’s also not meant to be a “comprehensive” history of the state. Facts are assumed to be known. helps a lot here. The book is essentially a sequential series of essays and narratives about influential indiv [...]


    • I did enjoy the book mainly for the stories of Californians. I am a sucker for behind the scenes, and what you thought you know but really didn't books like this. The only fault I can see is that if you aren't aleady familier with the history of CA, this book will be difficult to follow. What makes it readable is the realistic view of much mythologized things such as the Gold Rush and the Mission eras. Starr isn't afraid to give the unvarnished truth and that makes this book very interesting. I [...]


    • I tried. I tried for 178 pages and three weeks, but I couldn't do it anymore. This book is an extremely academic and contemplative look not at the history of California as such, but rather the concept of California in the minds of the nation, its citizens, its explorers, its minister and miners and intelligentsia, etc. At this point in my life, it's simply not a particularly engrossing read. Maybe at some other point, I'll try again.


    • When I was in 7th grade, I had a history teacher, Mr. Valente, who made history rise up from the classroom's floorboards and play out in front of my eyes. I was reminded of him often while reading Kevin Starr's chronicle of the astoundingly rapid settling of this state I've called home for so long. Especially gripping: the rise of San Francisco and the founding of Stanford University. Loved it and plan on reading the whole series.



    • Should be required reading for every Californian (and for those who love the state). See Starr's other works in this series.




    • i fell in love, i came home, i met my friends and heard their secrets - i was part of something larger than. this was the first of the series


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