Making and Remaking Horror in the 1970s and 2000s: Why Don T They Do It Like They Used To?

Making and Remaking Horror in the s and s Why Don T They Do It Like They Used To In Making and Remaking Horror in the s and s author David Roche takes up the assumption shared by many fans and scholars that original horror movies are disturbing and thus better than the re

  • Title: Making and Remaking Horror in the 1970s and 2000s: Why Don T They Do It Like They Used To?
  • Author: David Roche
  • ISBN: 9781617039621
  • Page: 125
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In Making and Remaking Horror in the 1970s and 2000s author David Roche takes up the assumption shared by many fans and scholars that original horror movies are disturbing, and thus better than the remakes He assesses the qualities of movies, old and recast, according to criteria that include subtext, originality, and cohesion With a methodology that combines a fIn Making and Remaking Horror in the 1970s and 2000s author David Roche takes up the assumption shared by many fans and scholars that original horror movies are disturbing, and thus better than the remakes He assesses the qualities of movies, old and recast, according to criteria that include subtext, originality, and cohesion With a methodology that combines a formalist and cultural studies approach, Roche sifts aspects of the American horror movie that have been widely addressed class, the patriarchal family, gender, and the opposition between terror and horror and those that have been somewhat neglected race, the Gothic, style, and verisimilitude Containing seventy eight black and white illustrations, the book is grounded in a close comparative analysis of the politics and aesthetics of four of the most significant independent American horror movies of the 1970s The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, The Hills Have Eyes, Dawn of the Dead, and Halloween and their twenty first century remakes.To what extent can the politics of these films be described as disturbing insomuch as they promote subversive subtexts that undermine essentialist perspectives Do the politics of the film lie on the surface or are they wedded to the film s aesthetics Early in the book, Roche explores historical contexts, aspects of identity race, ethnicity, and class , and the structuring role played by the motif of the American nuclear family He then asks to what extent these films disrupt genre expectations and attempt to provoke emotions of dread, terror, and horror through their representations of the monstrous and the formal strategies employed In this inquiry, he examines definitions of the genre and its metafictional nature Roche ends with a meditation on the extent to which the technical limitations of the horror films of the 1970s actually contribute to this disturbing quality Moving far beyond the genre itself, Making and Remaking Horror studies the redux as a form of adaptation and enables a complete discussion of the evolution of horror in contemporary American cinema.

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    • David Roche

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    684 thoughts on “Making and Remaking Horror in the 1970s and 2000s: Why Don T They Do It Like They Used To?

    • First a caveat: I was expecting a fun discussion of horror movies, and instead this read like a PhD thesis. And this is published by a university press, soearly I'm an idiot. :)But it's always fun for me to read about horror movies and this gave me a lot to think about.He chose to focus on originals from the 1970s and remakes from 2000s, which means that many film franchises aren't qualified (Friday the 13th and Nightmare on Elm Street premiered in the 1980s). He chose to focus on the originals [...]


    • I received an electronic advanced reading copy of this from the publisher via NetGalley.As a big fan of horror movies and someone that agrees with the sentiment that the originals made in the 1970s were more disturbing (and simply put 'better') than the remakes of the 2000s, I happily requested a chance to read this. Seeing the publisher is an academic press I figured it would have an academic tone, but didn't quite expect the degree to which this is an academic treatment. Its main weakness in t [...]


    • I was fascinated when I found out about the subject matter of this book. The horror movies of the seventies were a staple of my formative years and fueled the passion for horror that I hold so dear. The slew of remakes of seventies and eighties horror have often caused me to groan. The book is certainly not a shallow attack on remakes but a legitimate examination. David Roche looks at the similarities and differences in themes and wider meanings drawn from the films. Horror films are in many cas [...]


    • I have to admit I’m in two minds about this book. The premise is one that suits the horror fan in me right down to the ground, namely looking at (primarily) four classic horror movies from the 1970s and their 2000s remakes. The movies covered are The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Halloween, The Hills Have Eyes and Dawn of the Dead, three of which I adore both the originals and remakes, with only Rob Zombie’s Halloween reboot letting the side down as far as I’m concerned.David Roche has taken a [...]


    • This book is exactly what I have been starving for for years. An brilliant take on, not just the horror genre, and its perceived problems over the decades, but also film as an intellectual style that begs to be analyzed deeply. What one will get out of reading this is a new, and sometimes audacious, way of approaching horror films, past and new. Taking the originals and remakes of Dawn of the Dead, Halloween, The Hills Have Eyes, and Texas Chain Saw Massacre and breaking them down to their core [...]


    • In Making and Remaking Horror in the 1970s and 2000s author David Roche takes an academic look at four of the genre’s arguably most famous movies and their subsequent remakes; The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, The Hills Have Eyes, Dawn of the Dead, and Halloween. Roche seeks to answer the question of not the originals are better than the remakes, but why do both fans and critics consistently believe this to be true.Roche looks at not just the technical aspects of the films themselves, but the cult [...]


    • I like horror movies and all, but boy was this an in-depth look at horror movies. The author took a couple classic horror movies from the 1970's and compared them to the remakes of the 2000's. That sounds like an interesting enough idea, but this book was just way too dry to be enjoyable. I couldn't bring myself to get into this book because it was too analytical and too dry. The author writes as if this is his PhD thesis (I noticed that another reviewer mentioned that and I think it fits perfec [...]


    • Disclaimer: This ARC was given to me for free in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley.If you are expecting easy reading about horror films and pop culture do not read this book. It is an academic book that reads like a dissertation. That out of the way, I really liked this. It covers the cultural and subcultural times of the era when the originals and also of the remakes. It states that the remakes are not necessarily bad, but they reflect the change of the times between the two decades. [...]


    • I've asked myself the question in the title of this book a lot. As a horror fan since the late 80's I've seen the genre rise and fall dramatically .Films like the first Friday The 13th, Nightmare on Elm Street. And Night of The Living Dead, are very different from the slash fests of today. David Roche knows his stuff and is able to breakdown the hidden meanings in many films as well as exploring why he feels Horror films have changed over the years.


    • Great Book! Awesome text for philosophers of horror! Check out my full review here: interrogatingideologywithachai


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