Objects of Affection

Objects of Affection Everyday objects surround us the unconditional keepers of confessions and secrets They are with us in those private moments when we think we are alone perhapsin an abandoned stairwell or an empty li

  • Title: Objects of Affection
  • Author: Krishna Udayasankar
  • ISBN: 9789810760700
  • Page: 277
  • Format: Paperback
  • Everyday objects surround us, the unconditional keepers of confessions and secrets.They are with us in those private moments when we think we are alone, perhapsin an abandoned stairwell or an empty lift, as we adjust our clothes, checkourselves in the mirror, scratch an itch or allow ourselves a sigh or a sob.What if those inanimate witnesses to silent thought and hidden eEveryday objects surround us, the unconditional keepers of confessions and secrets.They are with us in those private moments when we think we are alone, perhapsin an abandoned stairwell or an empty lift, as we adjust our clothes, checkourselves in the mirror, scratch an itch or allow ourselves a sigh or a sob.What if those inanimate witnesses to silent thought and hidden emotion hadstories to tell Of love, betrayal and hope

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      Posted by:Krishna Udayasankar
      Published :2019-08-25T18:38:36+00:00

    About “Krishna Udayasankar

    • Krishna Udayasankar

      Krishna Udayasankar Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Objects of Affection book, this is one of the most wanted Krishna Udayasankar author readers around the world.

    290 thoughts on “Objects of Affection

    • I was drawn to the idea that inanimate objects secretly observe human lives, and they too have stories to tell. Most of the pieces discuss the darker side of love: betrayal and brokenness. It is interesting to see how people think they could pretend that there is nothing wrong, when in fact there is something that is not quite right. Other human being couldn't notice, probably too hung up about their own set of problems. But these silent observers, they take in more than they should. They see th [...]


    • Objects of Affection – ReviewI have been waiting for this e-book (Objects of Affection by Krishna Udayasankar) ever since I heard of its publication in print. After failing to get a paper copy to hold the book in my hands, turning pages and reading it the old fashioned way, I settled in for an e-book. As I tried to suppress my discontent and enjoy the book’s content, the author gave words to my own feelings in the book: “Happiness yet disappointment; a reminder of how life is good but not [...]


    • Book 2 of 2017: read on the two-hour flight from Cambodia to Singapore. To give you an idea, one of the pieces within the book:HAIRCLIPHe looks at me and wonders why my presence feels strange, remarkable. It's not as though the whole world can see me lying luxuriant in the palm of his hand and even if they could, why would they care.If they did, there are many explanations possible, some of them innocent and none of them are necessary. A woman was in his car, she could have been anyone, anyone a [...]


    • 3.5// Trigger warnings in this book: self harm //This was confusing but intriguing in this way that I have never read about before.


    • In Krishna Udayasankar's debut full-length collection of poetry, "Objects of Affection," the narrators of all the works are inanimate objects, observing their owners' memories, motives, and present actions. These pieces are quite striking and deeply intriguing for normal, everyday items. Even the cover of Objects is outstanding and it's just scattered fruit loops cereal on asphalt, yet it's one of the most unexpected and gorgeous covers I ever came across. Udayasankar takes the dull and mundane [...]



    • Initial thoughts: I really liked the concept that tied all these poems together: each poem was from the perspective of an object that came into contact with the same man and woman who remained nameless. Objects of Affection reminded me of the idiom, "the walls have ears," except taken literally. Each of the objects witnessed moments that were related in their respective poems. Strung up together they gave rise to a grand narrative that offered glimpses into these two intertwining lives.The indiv [...]


    • It's a collection of connected poems which describe human lives from the perspective of inanimate objects like paper, razor, etc. I am in love with Krishna Udayasankar's writing. Everything I've read by her went to my favourites list. Must read this one, even if you don't like poems. *Self harm triggers* Do not read if you're affected by descriptions of self harm.


    • Loved the way it debunked the high flatulence of poetry by crafting heart-aching stories of everyday quotidian objects. However, this might be better if it were written entirely in prose. Still, there is a deep yearning for elucidation on what happens yonder.


    • Makes me look at every inanimate object differently. A lot of the "witness accounts" are on extra-marital affairs though. Wish the experiences of the objects could be wider. Other than that, loved it!


    • Written from the perspective of objects, this collection of prose poetry is wonderfully written. The pieces are all linked and gives insight into the cycle of marriage. It's easy to read and the style of writing is accessible to anyone.


    • Wonderful. Whether considered a collection of linked prose poems or a minimalist novel, Objects of Affection does a brilliant job indirectly revealing the life cycle of a marriage, from meet cute to commitment to dalliance to reconciliation. Highly recommended.




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