Entre Nous: A Woman's Guide to Finding Her Inner French Girl

Entre Nous A Woman s Guide to Finding Her Inner French Girl Provocative and practical lively and intelligent Entre Nous unlocks the mystery of the French girl and the secrets of her self possession Why do French women always look inimitably stylish How do th

  • Title: Entre Nous: A Woman's Guide to Finding Her Inner French Girl
  • Author: Debra Ollivier
  • ISBN: 9780312308773
  • Page: 361
  • Format: Paperback
  • Provocative and practical, lively and intelligent, Entre Nous unlocks the mystery of the French girl and the secrets of her self possession Why do French women always look inimitably stylish How do they manage to sit in a caf for a three course lunch and a glass of wine themselves What gives them the certainty that allows them to refuse anything whether a man, a jProvocative and practical, lively and intelligent, Entre Nous unlocks the mystery of the French girl and the secrets of her self possession Why do French women always look inimitably stylish How do they manage to sit in a caf for a three course lunch and a glass of wine themselves What gives them the certainty that allows them to refuse anything whether a man, a job, or a little black dress that doesn t suit them perfectly More than just a book on fashion, Entre Nous is about the essence of French living its observations about French women and their ways will help you take the best of all pages from the French girl s book the page that reveals how to really enjoy life Ollivier spent a decade in France and learned a thing or two about how French women cultivate that sense of being easy in one s skin she helps us bridge the cultural gap Seattle Times

    • Unlimited [Classics Book] ✓ Entre Nous: A Woman's Guide to Finding Her Inner French Girl - by Debra Ollivier ↠
      361 Debra Ollivier
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Classics Book] ✓ Entre Nous: A Woman's Guide to Finding Her Inner French Girl - by Debra Ollivier ↠
      Posted by:Debra Ollivier
      Published :2019-02-26T02:02:43+00:00

    About “Debra Ollivier

    • Debra Ollivier

      Ollivier lived in France for over ten years, had her two children there, and became a dual citizen She currently divides her time between Paris and Los Angeles, where she lives with her family, and is at work on a historical novel.

    864 thoughts on “Entre Nous: A Woman's Guide to Finding Her Inner French Girl

    • Okay, I knew this book would be silly, but I have to say, it's pretty dumb. If all French girls are white, heterosexual and rich then maybe the author has a point about how to live like a French girl. For example, she says things like "Every French girl has a country home" uh, really? She does dispense some good advice, like be self-possessed, think before you speak, edit your wardrobe, enjoy life and don't count calories, but are those trains particularly French? I'm not sure. The best part of [...]


    • My intellectual pride doesn't want me to list this on my bookshelf (could that be why I just remembered to review Jorge Luis Borges?), but I actually found this more interesting and thought-provoking than expected (and an exceedingly quick read). I checked it out from the library after seeing it somewhere, and I was expecting to chuckle all the way through at the stereotypes before throwing it down in self-righteous disgust.Of course this is lightweight chick nonfiction, and best stayed away fro [...]


    • Well, it started off strong, but then it started to feel like Ollivier was the geeky chick in the lunch room who wants so badly to be liked by the popular girls that she fails to realize they are making fun of her. By the end of the book I no longer wanted to find my inner French girl, I really wanted to have her exorcised. The author is impressed by the French and their connection to family - maybe she needs to examine her own lack of family ties because it didn't seem that odd to me. And yet i [...]


    • Okay, I read the first half of this book with relish (wine and chocolate with every dinner? nights in with Proust? Oui-oui!) and then sort of lost steam. That French women think baby showers are bad luck and like bed ruffles is not as interesting to me as their coquettishness and rampant nude-bathing, on which I wish Ollivier had further expounded. The book is worth reading if just for the film recommendations and "French Girls We Love" profiles.


    • I'm a hardcore francophile but this book disgusts me. It's snide and stuck-up and overly generalistic. I've lived in France and I could count on one hand the number of women I met who fall into the author's stereotype. There is NOTHING original about her grand statements either. "The French girl is always fashionable. The French girl loves food. The French girl doesn't live to work." Blah, blah, blah. The worst thing about this book though is how hypocritical it is. The whole "point" of the book [...]



    • Debra Ollivier is a California girl who’s lived in France for 10 years. There she married her husband, had two children and discovered what being a French girl is all about, beyond the stereotype of thin and stylish. And let me tell you, it's not all about wine and cheese and fancy lingerie. I’ve always had a soft spot for all things French. Some of my favorite authors are Jules Verne, Alexandre Dumas Pere, Anne Golon and I dream of being able to read their books without translation. The lit [...]


    • It's fine, a quick read. I like it because I love lists--it had lists of "things every house should have" (e.g. "lavatory paper" and "eggs" I don't know, I love the mundane and something called "Spontex"), lists of clothes, etc.--this is why it's 3 star instead of 2 star. But I don't really recommend it for anyone else for any other reason. It's sort of only skin deep, but if you're looking for a light read, it fits the bill.If you really want some deeper insight into French culture, history, a [...]


    • While it is a fun read at times, it is filled with ridiculous generalizations of both French women and Americans. I was constantly offended by the American stereotype and I end up yelling things like, "I can cook!" "I'm not fat!" "I'm not vain, shallow, or fake!" "I don't wear pajamas out of the house!" Also, every quote coming from the author's French friends was offensive and did not help the snooty French stereotype. It was so infuriating! I also found offensivee the idea that Americans don't [...]


    • I bought this at Anthropologie. I love that store. I can't fit the clothing there, so I buy all the books. This book is great. I read it once a year at least. It's very silly. It tells you how to awaken the inner-french girl in you. Purrrrr. I like that each section gives you suggestions on books, movies, and has great little French quotes. Oooh la laaaah.


    • To me this was a great light, fun and even inspiring read. There were definitely some ideals in this book that I would like to implement into my own life, such as the French girl's love of REAL food, the time she devotes to herself, and how self contained she is. However there are definitely a few things that made no sense to me, like the French girl's love of family but her acceptance of (and almost expectation of) adultery in her marriage. But then again, this book almost makes it seem as if t [...]


    • I have always been astounded at the sheer number of books of this ilk that describe how the French have a certain "je ne sais quoi" that the rest of us philistine Americans can and should emulate. And it's always the French who seem to hold our fascination and inspire our desire to imitate. For example, you never see this kind of a book urging us to find our inner German, Italian, Japanese, Swedish, Russian, Mexican or any other kind of a girl. We just all seem to want to be more French. (Well, [...]


    • I was about 98% I would mainly be reading this book for irritainment purposes, but I had no idea just how off the charts irritating it would get. For starters, that "Finding Your Inner French Girl" subtitle. I didn't realize that Debra Ollivier basically makes the term "French Girl" a total state of mind and possibly trademarked brand name, and it's used constantly. On every page. And since one of my ultimate pedantic crank pet peeves is when people refer to women as girls, this got really, real [...]


    • I really liked some of this book and really hated other parts. First, the ugly--The author promotes the French amoral, socialistic, atheististic values, or lack thereof, and wonders why Americans aren't more liberal. Huh? Anyway, I prefer the old-fashioned American values, like open doors, honesty, and hard work.This was an easy, fast read, and was fun to read about French history, authors, and other French things, which I love. I liked the promotion of the idea of "living a beautiful life." --n [...]


    • I enjoyed the read and the ride through Paris via Debra Ollivier's eyes. I am so proud to be an American but have always loved France aussi. I hope American/French cultures continue our friendship. I now want to return to Parisbut if not meant to beI now have lots of les Films and Les Livers to explored I will. In fact, I ordered Woody Allen's 'Midnight in Paris' from just last night when I finished reading this uplifting book on Paris. Oh , musique aussi,I am playing 'Amelie' as I write my opi [...]


    • I should be Clementine in my next life. I really just LOVE how Europeans, especially Latin women, live. Lovely ladies, read this book, and smile as you live as pleasantly, tastefully and yet humbly like these womenR A FUN COMPARISON OF A PERFECTLY PARADOX AMERICAN LIFE, READ: The Joys of Much Too Much.


    • Most of the advice was kind of obnoxious and generic. French girls savor their food. French girls take care of their skin. French girls save up for a Birkin bag and wear it for the rest of their lives. French girls don't care if their husbands have mistresses. The most useful part was the bit about how to shop for fruit at a farmer's market.


    • I'll admit it. I'm a little embarrassed to be adding this to my list. But I can't help it - it's one of those books that I love going back to and re-reading chapters when I'm stuck in bed with a cold. Or if I just want a push to rent a movie. Unfortunately, the Blockbuster in Yardley never had Jules et Jim.


    • Way too gushing and unrealistic. Pity, the book looked so nice and promising, which is why I actually bought it. But how can I take someone seriously who considers going topless the height of sophistication which she longs to achieve? Please!!! Chucked this one out, and good riddance.


    • I have read this book on and off throughout the year - my friend Maya gave it to me last Christmas. It is a delight!! I am a French girl at heart having been raised in New Orleans with a father who's first language was French. While I'm also half Italian, I am always secretly drawing on my 'inner French girl' to move through my life. Some things I haven't quite gotten perfect yet but I'm working on them all. I love the flair, the "je ne sais quoi" that the French so nonchalantly exhibit. If you' [...]





    • This little book that is supposed to help you find your Inner French Girl is more of a very quick recount of what makes the French Girl who she ise way she takes care of her skin, her innate sensuality, her passion for rich foods while maintaining a perfect figure, being secure with whatever her figure is, and how her house has that certain je ne sais quoi, while never letting her secrets out. I was left wanting wanting to be able to incorporate some aspects of a French Girl’s world, and wanti [...]


    • What is it about French women? They eat rich, calorie-laden food, yet are impossibly thin. They are effortlessly stylish, doing more with one scarf than most women do with an entire outfit. They are sophisticated and intellectual, not crass and fatuous. French women just have that, how does it go? Ah, oui, je ne sais quoi.Yes, I do know I just described French women using a few clichés (great French word, cliché, non?), but sometimes clichés are clichés because they are true. And being a hug [...]


    • The largest issue with this book is that the advice contained only works if you live in France or among others who share French cultural norms. Cultivating "mystery" by talking only about politics or books to people who are used to being open--and used to others being open--will only result in alienation and misinterpretation--particularly if you continue this tactic for eight years, like one of the author's friends . . . you'll be lucky if those "friends" stick around for so long. Likewise, unl [...]


    • Just because I love French wine, Le Cordon Bleu, pate de foie gras, Hermes and some form of le tour eiffel can be found in every room in my house, does not mean I'm a Francophile.I also don't read self-help books. Unless you consider The Gospel According to Coco Chanel, Barefoot Contessa Back to Basics or Confessions of a Window Dresser to be self-help books. I don't want to be a girl. Thankyouverymuch. I'm comfortable being who I am. It took me long enough to get here, I'm going to enjoy it.But [...]


    • I cannot recommend this book. I am ashamed that I paid for it. Upon completing it, I felt like the author owed me several hours of wasted time and a full refund.This book is not about finding one's inner French girl.This book is nothing more than page after page of an author complaining about France not being America and the French not being American. Perhaps if the author had not be obsessed with the notion that the French should live as Americans do, she may have been able to write about her F [...]


    • A recent reviewer of this book said, "My intellectual pride doesn't want me to list this on my bookshelf (could that be why I just remembered to review Jorge Luis Borges?), but I actually found this more interesting and thought-provoking than expected (and an exceedingly quick read)." She is spot-on. I'm an American woman with very strong German and Greek presences in my family.I enjoy French culture, but do not desire to BE a French woman out of some insecurity about my own roots. I love readin [...]



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