The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas

The Archive and the Repertoire Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas In The Archive and the Repertoire preeminent performance studies scholar Diana Taylor provides a new understanding of the vital role of performance in the Americas From plays to official events to gra

  • Title: The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas
  • Author: Diana Taylor
  • ISBN: 9780822331230
  • Page: 399
  • Format: Paperback
  • In The Archive and the Repertoire preeminent performance studies scholar Diana Taylor provides a new understanding of the vital role of performance in the Americas From plays to official events to grassroots protests, performance, she argues, must be taken seriously as a means of storing and transmitting knowledge Taylor reveals how the repertoire of embodied memory convIn The Archive and the Repertoire preeminent performance studies scholar Diana Taylor provides a new understanding of the vital role of performance in the Americas From plays to official events to grassroots protests, performance, she argues, must be taken seriously as a means of storing and transmitting knowledge Taylor reveals how the repertoire of embodied memory conveyed in gestures, the spoken word, movement, dance, song, and other performances offers alternative perspectives to those derived from the written archive and is particularly useful to a reconsideration of historical processes of transnational contact The Archive and the Repertoire invites a remapping of the Americas based on traditions of embodied practice.Examining various genres of performance including demonstrations by the children of the disappeared in Argentina, the Peruvian theatre group Yuyachkani, and televised astrological readings by Univision personality Walter Mercado, Taylor explores how the archive and the repertoire work together to make political claims, transmit traumatic memory, and forge a new sense of cultural identity Through her consideration of performances such as Coco Fusco and Guillermo G mez Pe a s show Two Undiscovered Amerindians Visit , Taylor illuminates how scenarios of discovery and conquest haunt the Americas, trapping even those who attempt to dismantle them Meditating on events like those of September 11, 2001 and media representations of them, she examines both the crucial role of performance in contemporary culture and her own role as witness to and participant in hemispheric dramas The Archive and the Repertoire is a compelling demonstration of the many ways that the study of performance enables a deeper understanding of the past and present, of ourselves and others.

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    • Diana Taylor

      Diana Taylor Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas book, this is one of the most wanted Diana Taylor author readers around the world.

    972 thoughts on “The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas

    • The distinction between the archive and the repertoire as different modes of conveying knowledge and culture is a useful one, though I am not convinced it is as distinct from the written/oral language divide as Taylor would like to believe. She distinguishes between the archive as the set of physical artifacts--including written texts, relics, recordings, etc.--and the repertoire of scenarios and performed behaviors passed down through cultures that make communication and meaning-making practice [...]


    • Approaching the history and political present of the Americas through the lens of performance, Taylor offers methodological tools for approaching those unwritten histories, the histories of the never quite vanquished, that persist in our cultural repertoires. Particularly striking and useful for me in terms of approaching history as a scholar of performance is the idea of repetitive "scenarios" that play out over time as kinds of scripts. Taylor takes the "scenario" of encounter, underscoring th [...]


    • This book makes you rethink the whole concept of what is an archive, what deserves to be archived, what is the historical context of the archive, who gets to choose what is archived, and how is a performance an archive. To be honest, it poses a bunch of more thoughts as well. Diana Taylor brings up so many questions that don't necessarily provide you with an answer, but gets you critically thinking about archives, performances, transculturism, and plethora of other thoughts and theories. This bo [...]


    • A wonderful interrogation of the nature of knowledge and the cultural tensions at play whenever "knowing" happens. Taylor presents the central issues of the field of Performance Studies through a dual lens of Theater Studies and the culture(s) of the Americas. She succeeds in making both accessible to an audience lacking background in either, though I suspect that previous knowledge in one or both fields would further enrich the reading experience.


    • This is a theory-laden book that many will find challenging to read; yet the reward is very thought-provoking, subtle analysis of fascinating cases. I would especially recommend the chapters on the theater troupe Yuyuchkani and on the Madres & H.I.J.O.S. of the disappeared victims of the Dirty War in Argentina. I anticipate revisiting Taylor's work in the future.


    • Such an overly pedantic text, all I wanted to do was punch the author and the editors. Not a pleasant read. Really interesting and current ideas, a necessary discussion of "the other" and how marginalization happens, but when the language is prohibitive, reading the text just becomes a chore rather than a discovery.


    • I read the chapters assigned by my professor. I love her idea of repertoire and theatre as a way to transmit knowledge--embodied knowledge. It raises quite a few interesting questions about archive and repertoire, about writing and performing, and about memorizing and forgetting


    • I read this book in three sittings, for a class. The overall consensus of the class was that the stories and examples of performance as an alternative to the archive were fascinating and relevant. However, the over-use of the word "liminality" was a turn-off.





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