Childhood in Verse and Prose - An Anthology

Childhood in Verse and Prose An Anthology Text extracted from opening pages of book CHILDHOOD IN V ERSE AND PROSE CHOSEN BY SUSAN MILES HUMPHREY MILFORD OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS PRINTED IN ENGLAND AT THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS BY FREDERI

  • Title: Childhood in Verse and Prose - An Anthology
  • Author: Susan Miles
  • ISBN: 9781406758245
  • Page: 248
  • Format: Paperback
  • Text extracted from opening pages of book CHILDHOOD IN V ERSE AND PROSE CHOSEN BY SUSAN MILES HUMPHREY MILFORD OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS 1923 PRINTED IN ENGLAND AT THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS BY FREDERICK HALL TO MISS MARGARET E THOMPSON GRATEFULLY AND WITH AFFECTION PREFACE THIS anthology is the result of an attempt to bring together, within the scope of a single volume,Text extracted from opening pages of book CHILDHOOD IN V ERSE AND PROSE CHOSEN BY SUSAN MILES HUMPHREY MILFORD OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS 1923 PRINTED IN ENGLAND AT THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS BY FREDERICK HALL TO MISS MARGARET E THOMPSON GRATEFULLY AND WITH AFFECTION PREFACE THIS anthology is the result of an attempt to bring together, within the scope of a single volume, those passages of English literature from the fourteenth to the twentieth century which deal most happily with children and with childhood Any attempt to justify in a pieface the sclt ction of passages cannot but be futile The extracts must speak for themseUes But it is perhaps permissible to note in passing that an attem t has been made to resist that tendency towards sentimentality which is so common and so disastrous a failing in writers whose concern is with childhood The book is intended for those lovers of literature who happen also to be lovers of children it is not intended to appeal directly to the maternal instinct Doubtless many passages which should have been included are omitted because the compiler is unfortunately ignorant of them Of these, obviously, nothing can be said But the limitation of space is responsible for the omission of much that is iccognized as having a strong claim for inclusion The decision to economize by re fusing to admit translations except in the case of the brief aphorisms which head each section has involved the with drawal of the Shunammitc s son who died upon his mother s knees, of the Lord s little servant in the Temple, and of that goodly child on whom the daughter of Pharaoh PREFACE had compassion It has ruled out Astyanax, the son of Hector Dante sBeatrice St Augustine, the babe and boy Canace s piteous son, from Lydgate s Fall of Princes Sir Thomas More s young infants of Utopia a passage on the punishment of childish faults from Florio s Montaigne and another dealing with the question as to howe a maiden ought to be broughte up, which shall be a Christian , from The Christian Man s Closet, a large discourse, made dialogue ivise, very pleasant to reade and most profitable to practise, collected in Latin by Bartholomew Batty and Englished by William Lowth American writers have been excluded again because of the limitation of space and passages from Walt Whitman have been reluctantly withdrawn Extracts from Pearl the fourteenth century poem on a father s loss of his child have been omitted, on the ground that they would probably be largely unintelligible to the general reader unless tianslatcd Coventry Pat s poem If I were dead, you d sometimes say Poor child has also been with drawn, as there appears to be no justification for doubt that the poem refers to his wife and not, as has often been supposed, to a child Many passages have been omitted on account of the extreme difficulty of excision The critic whose impulse it is to find fault because Tom the Sweep is not among 4 Young Toilers is invited to tuin to The Water Babies to see how hard it is in a detached paragraph or in half a dozen paragraphs to get him there And where, it may be asked, is Peepy Jellaby, with his clergyman s hat and his ploughman s boots, and his scratched legb bearing their chart of his mishaps He refused to be inveigled, shy PREFACE not unnaturally, perhaps at the approach of another woman with a pen and a purpose Pip provedevasive too, and Sentimental Tommy sat down firmly with Shovel on his stair and refused to budge Nor would Hugh Proctor be cajoled away from Ciofton His loyalty was character istic but unkind Other children who had seemed in recollection to have a substance of their own, proved upon examination wholly intangible There was Swift s little girl, for instance, crying provocatively, I ve got an apple, Miss, and I shan t give you some There was nothing to catch at she had peeped, mocking, and was gone The farcical and the purely fantastic ha e been alike omi

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      248 Susan Miles
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    About “Susan Miles

    • Susan Miles

      Susan Miles was born Ursula Wyllie in 1887 in India, where her father was a colonel Educated in London, in 1909 she married William Roberts, who was Rector of St George s, Bloomsbury from 1917 38 Under the name Susan Miles she was a published novelist and poet in 1920 Harold Monro singled her out in Contemporary Poets as one of the fifty most important poets then writing She also two novels, a novel in verse Lettice Delmer and a biography of her husband entitled Portrait of a Parson She died in 1975.

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